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Cybercrime Diploma

Level 3 / NCFE / PI215

The Cybercrime Diploma is aimed at providing the learner with detailed knowledge on the different types of cyber-related crime.
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course duration: 360 hrs

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Course Description

The Diploma in Cybercrime opens the door to the world of crime that largely remains hidden behind misleading statistics and its many definitions, e.g. Criminal motivations, public and media fears and misperceived offenders. There is no doubt that ‘cyberspace’ appears to offer a vast range of new opportunities for criminal and deviant activities. It is a domain, with a brief history of barely three decades, which has been plagued with fears about its darker, border-free criminal activity, a fear felt by individuals and companies alike. Cybercrime offenders no longer require complex skills or techniques originally attributable to the first hackers. In the developing country context, in particular, sub-cultures of young engaged in computer-related financial fraud have emerged, many of whom begin involvement in cybercrime in later teenage years. Victims, however, are far-reaching, hence the fear. This is unsurprising given the range of offences which spread from online credit card fraud, identity and data theft, phishing, unauthorised access to an e-mail account, to child pornography, hate speech and post 9/11 concerns about global cyber terrorism.

This comprehensive Diploma contains a number of modules which tackle the considerable literature addressing issues such as the types of offences, the causes and motivations behind cyber-offending, the experiences of the victims of such crimes, the challenges facing investigative authorities, and the attempts at cybersecurity and how cybercrime is shaping the future development and use of the internet.

The initial modules provide an overview of cybercrime and the various types committed, from the most widespread offences such as hacking, identity theft and the use of viruses (considered cyber-dependent crime), to fraud, theft and sex offending (cyber-enabled crime). This includes descriptions and explanations of how the crimes are committed and possible motivations of the offenders. Particular attention is focused on subsequent modules dealing with more contemporary issues such as cyberstalking and bullying and how the development of social media has influenced the scale of such crimes. An overview of the challenges is also provided in later modules, as they relate to the investigation and prosecution of cybercrime.

After a summary of some of the investigative strategies undertaken by international and regional organisations in the fight against cybercrime, the course then continues with an analysis of different approaches with regard to international cooperation, the responsibility of Internet service providers and cybersecurity. Throughout the modules, learners are presented with case studies and assignments which require taking different disciplinary perspectives to answer essay questions and/or investigative perspectives in order to solve challenges or crimes.

This course will incorporate a variety of perspectives: psychology; criminological psychology; criminology; law; computer science; policing; security and intelligence services; government policy, etc. For this reason, there will be a multitude of terms and abbreviations which may be new to the learner. These include terms from the innocent sounding ‘vishing’ (as oppose to ‘smishing’) or ‘pharming’ or the scary sounding Carberp Trojan and Doxing (a favoured approach of hacktivists) to the more commonly-used terms such as cyber-espionage or Identity Theft.

Abbreviations which are frequently used in the cybercrime policy and support literature may also be relatively unknown even to learners who are computer and technology savvy – e.g. IC3, EMV, NFSA, SFA, PUK, etc. For this reason, a Glossary/Abbreviations table is provided in the opening Introduction. It is recommended the student print off this section and keep handy when reading through the various modules.

To be awarded the Diploma in Cybercrime learners are required to successfully complete all sixteen modules.

Modules

Introduction - Defining Cybercrimes (+ Glossary)
Module 1 - Cyber-dependent Crime (I)   - Hacking & Hacktivism
Module 2 - Cyber-dependent Crime (II)  - Malware
Module 3 - Cyber-dependent Crime (III) - DoS Attacks
Module 4 - Cyber-enabled Crime (I)   - Cyber-Frauds, Scams & Cons
Module 5 - Cyber-enabled Crime (II)  - Theft
Module 6 - Cyber-enabled Crime (III) - Sex Offending
Module 7 - Cyber-enabled Crime (IV) - Cyberterrorism
Module 8 - Cyberstalking & Paedophilia
Module 9 - Cyberbullying
Module 10 - Organised Cybercrime
Module 11 - Virtual ‘Pirates’: Intellectual property, copyright & piracy
Module 12 - e-Crime Investigation (I)  - Legislation
Module 13 - e-Crime Investigation (II) - Digital Evidence
Module 14 - e-Crime Investigation (II) – Investigative Strategy & Procedure
Module 15 - Cyber Security – The Threat
Module 15 - Reducing Cyber Risk

Previous Knowledge Required

The good news is that no previous knowledge is required to study the Cybercrime Diploma. This course is available to individuals who have an interest in this area and who are looking to take an engaging home study programme. Learners are able to enrol onto the Cybercrime Diploma at any time of year and can study at their own pace for a period of up to 12 months from registration and receive full tutor support.

Although there is no requirement of previous knowledge, learners may wish to study this course alongside another of our crime related courses such as our Criminology Diploma. If you do choose to bundle this course with another you can receive a £80 discount from the total course price!

Assessment

Learners are required to complete a tutor marked assignment at the end of each module. This assignment will test the learners knowledge on the specific information covered in each module and will require the learner to show evidence of an understanding into Cybercrime.

Upon successful completion of the 16 modules, learners will receive their Diploma in Cybercrime from the awarding organisation NCFE.

Awarding Organisation

This course has been accredited under the NCFE IIQ Licence by NCC Resources Limited which has been approved as an NCFE Investing in Quality (IIQ) centre to give formal recognition to courses. At the end of this course, successful learners will be awarded a certificate of achievement by NCFE. The training course has been designed specifically to meet the needs of learners who prefer to study from home. The course measurable learning outcomes have been benchmarked at Level 3 (using Ofqual's Qualification and Credit Framework (QCF) level descriptors) to allow you to consider the depth of study, difficulty, and level of achievement involved

Support

You will be provided with comprehensive learning materials designed to provide you with everything you need to successfully complete the Cybercrime Diploma. You will have your own dedicated tutor who will guide you through the course work and answer any questions you may have during your studies. Additionally, our Help Desk will provide you with any practical advice by email or phone should you require additional support.

The course comes with 12 months tutor support, however, you are able to study at your own pace and can complete the course in a shorter period if required. Should you require additional time, you may extend your tutor support if appropriate.

Your tutor is there to assess any submitted work and provide feedback alongside answering any questions or queries you may have during your studies.

 

course description

Course Description

The Diploma in Cybercrime opens the door to the world of crime that largely remains hidden behind misleading statistics and its many definitions, e.g. Criminal motivations, public and media fears and misperceived offenders. There is no doubt that ‘cyberspace’ appears to offer a vast range of new opportunities for criminal and deviant activities. It is a domain, with a brief history of barely three decades, which has been plagued with fears about its darker, border-free criminal activity, a fear felt by individuals and companies alike. Cybercrime offenders no longer require complex skills or techniques originally attributable to the first hackers. In the developing country context, in particular, sub-cultures of young engaged in computer-related financial fraud have emerged, many of whom begin involvement in cybercrime in later teenage years. Victims, however, are far-reaching, hence the fear. This is unsurprising given the range of offences which spread from online credit card fraud, identity and data theft, phishing, unauthorised access to an e-mail account, to child pornography, hate speech and post 9/11 concerns about global cyber terrorism.

This comprehensive Diploma contains a number of modules which tackle the considerable literature addressing issues such as the types of offences, the causes and motivations behind cyber-offending, the experiences of the victims of such crimes, the challenges facing investigative authorities, and the attempts at cybersecurity and how cybercrime is shaping the future development and use of the internet.

The initial modules provide an overview of cybercrime and the various types committed, from the most widespread offences such as hacking, identity theft and the use of viruses (considered cyber-dependent crime), to fraud, theft and sex offending (cyber-enabled crime). This includes descriptions and explanations of how the crimes are committed and possible motivations of the offenders. Particular attention is focused on subsequent modules dealing with more contemporary issues such as cyberstalking and bullying and how the development of social media has influenced the scale of such crimes. An overview of the challenges is also provided in later modules, as they relate to the investigation and prosecution of cybercrime.

After a summary of some of the investigative strategies undertaken by international and regional organisations in the fight against cybercrime, the course then continues with an analysis of different approaches with regard to international cooperation, the responsibility of Internet service providers and cybersecurity. Throughout the modules, learners are presented with case studies and assignments which require taking different disciplinary perspectives to answer essay questions and/or investigative perspectives in order to solve challenges or crimes.

This course will incorporate a variety of perspectives: psychology; criminological psychology; criminology; law; computer science; policing; security and intelligence services; government policy, etc. For this reason, there will be a multitude of terms and abbreviations which may be new to the learner. These include terms from the innocent sounding ‘vishing’ (as oppose to ‘smishing’) or ‘pharming’ or the scary sounding Carberp Trojan and Doxing (a favoured approach of hacktivists) to the more commonly-used terms such as cyber-espionage or Identity Theft.

Abbreviations which are frequently used in the cybercrime policy and support literature may also be relatively unknown even to learners who are computer and technology savvy – e.g. IC3, EMV, NFSA, SFA, PUK, etc. For this reason, a Glossary/Abbreviations table is provided in the opening Introduction. It is recommended the student print off this section and keep handy when reading through the various modules.

To be awarded the Diploma in Cybercrime learners are required to successfully complete all sixteen modules.

previous knowledge required

Previous Knowledge Required

The good news is that no previous knowledge is required to study the Cybercrime Diploma. This course is available to individuals who have an interest in this area and who are looking to take an engaging home study programme. Learners are able to enrol onto the Cybercrime Diploma at any time of year and can study at their own pace for a period of up to 12 months from registration and receive full tutor support.

Although there is no requirement of previous knowledge, learners may wish to study this course alongside another of our crime related courses such as our Criminology Diploma. If you do choose to bundle this course with another you can receive a £80 discount from the total course price!

assessment

Assessment

Learners are required to complete a tutor marked assignment at the end of each module. This assignment will test the learners knowledge on the specific information covered in each module and will require the learner to show evidence of an understanding into Cybercrime.

Upon successful completion of the 16 modules, learners will receive their Diploma in Cybercrime from the awarding organisation NCFE.

support

Support

You will be provided with comprehensive learning materials designed to provide you with everything you need to successfully complete the Cybercrime Diploma. You will have your own dedicated tutor who will guide you through the course work and answer any questions you may have during your studies. Additionally, our Help Desk will provide you with any practical advice by email or phone should you require additional support.

The course comes with 12 months tutor support, however, you are able to study at your own pace and can complete the course in a shorter period if required. Should you require additional time, you may extend your tutor support if appropriate.

Your tutor is there to assess any submitted work and provide feedback alongside answering any questions or queries you may have during your studies.

 

modules

Modules

Introduction - Defining Cybercrimes (+ Glossary)
Module 1 - Cyber-dependent Crime (I)   - Hacking & Hacktivism
Module 2 - Cyber-dependent Crime (II)  - Malware
Module 3 - Cyber-dependent Crime (III) - DoS Attacks
Module 4 - Cyber-enabled Crime (I)   - Cyber-Frauds, Scams & Cons
Module 5 - Cyber-enabled Crime (II)  - Theft
Module 6 - Cyber-enabled Crime (III) - Sex Offending
Module 7 - Cyber-enabled Crime (IV) - Cyberterrorism
Module 8 - Cyberstalking & Paedophilia
Module 9 - Cyberbullying
Module 10 - Organised Cybercrime
Module 11 - Virtual ‘Pirates’: Intellectual property, copyright & piracy
Module 12 - e-Crime Investigation (I)  - Legislation
Module 13 - e-Crime Investigation (II) - Digital Evidence
Module 14 - e-Crime Investigation (II) – Investigative Strategy & Procedure
Module 15 - Cyber Security – The Threat
Module 15 - Reducing Cyber Risk

awarding organisation

Awarding Organisation

This course has been accredited under the NCFE IIQ Licence by NCC Resources Limited which has been approved as an NCFE Investing in Quality (IIQ) centre to give formal recognition to courses. At the end of this course, successful learners will be awarded a certificate of achievement by NCFE. The training course has been designed specifically to meet the needs of learners who prefer to study from home. The course measurable learning outcomes have been benchmarked at Level 3 (using Ofqual's Qualification and Credit Framework (QCF) level descriptors) to allow you to consider the depth of study, difficulty, and level of achievement involved