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Cybercrime Short Course

The The Cybercrime Short Course aims to provide the learner with knowledge on Cybercrime.

Level 3 / Downloadable NCC Certificate / SHORT9

£95.00

Method of study

online

Course Title:Cybercrime Short Course

Awarding Body:Downloadable Certificate

Average Duration:10 hrs

Course Support:12 months access to course

Course Description

The short course in Cybercrime opens the door to the world of crime that largely remains hidden behind misleading statistics and its many definitions, e.g. Criminal motivations, public and media fears and misperceived offenders. There is no doubt that ‘cyberspace’ appears to offer a vast range of new opportunities for criminal and deviant activities. It is a domain, with a brief history of barely three decades, which has been plagued with fears about its darker, border-free criminal activity, a fear felt by individuals and companies alike. Cybercrime offenders no longer require complex skills or techniques originally attributable to the first hackers. In the developing country context, in particular, sub-cultures of young engaged in computer-related financial fraud have emerged, many of whom begin involvement in cybercrime in later teenage years. Victims, however, are far-reaching, hence the fear. This is unsurprising given the range of offences which spread from online credit card fraud, identity and data theft, phishing, unauthorised access to an e-mail account, to child pornography, hate speech and post 9/11 concerns about global cyber terrorism.

This comprehensive short course contains a number of modules which tackle the considerable literature addressing issues such as the types of offences, the causes and motivations behind cyber-offending, the experiences of the victims of such crimes, the challenges facing investigative authorities, and the attempts at cybersecurity and how cybercrime is shaping the future development and use of the internet.

The initial modules provide an overview of cybercrime and the various types committed, from the most widespread offences such as hacking, identity theft and the use of viruses (considered cyber-dependent crime), to fraud, theft and sex offending (cyber-enabled crime). This includes descriptions and explanations of how the crimes are committed and possible motivations of the offenders. Particular attention is focused on subsequent modules dealing with more contemporary issues such as cyberstalking and bullying and how the development of social media has influenced the scale of such crimes. An overview of the challenges is also provided in later modules, as they relate to the investigation and prosecution of cybercrime.

After a summary of some of the investigative strategies undertaken by international and regional organisations in the fight against cybercrime, the course then continues with an analysis of different approaches with regard to international cooperation, the responsibility of Internet service providers and cybersecurity. Throughout the modules, learners are presented with case studies and assignments which require taking different disciplinary perspectives to answer essay questions and/or investigative perspectives in order to solve challenges or crimes.

This course will incorporate a variety of perspectives: psychology; criminological psychology; criminology; law; computer science; policing; security and intelligence services; government policy, etc. For this reason, there will be a multitude of terms and abbreviations which may be new to the learner. These include terms from the innocent sounding ‘vishing’ (as oppose to ‘smishing’) or ‘pharming’ or the scary sounding Carberp Trojan and Doxing (a favoured approach of hacktivists) to the more commonly-used terms such as cyber-espionage or Identity Theft.

Abbreviations which are frequently used in the cybercrime policy and support literature may also be relatively unknown even to learners who are computer and technology savvy – e.g. IC3, EMV, NFSA, SFA, PUK, etc. For this reason, a Glossary/Abbreviations table is provided in the opening Introduction. It is recommended the student print off this section and keep handy when reading through the various modules.

This is a knowledge based online course, with a short multiple choice exam after you've read all of the learning material. A downloadable certificate will be available upon completion from NCC Resources

Course Info

Course Title:Cybercrime Short Course

Awarding Body:Downloadable Certificate

Average Duration:10 hrs

Course Support:12 months access to course

Previous Knowledge

The good news is that no prior learning knowledge or experience is essential to take this course. This short course is openly available to anyone wishing to learn more about Cybercrime and would like to take part in a highly rewarding home study course. You'll have access to the course for twelve months, with no tutor support provided

Note: This is a self study short course, with a multiple choice exam for completion. You'll be provided with an NCC Certificate.

Assessment

There is no assessment, you'll complete a multiple choice exam to complete the short course.

Awarding Organisation

At the end of this short course successful learners will be awarded a downloadable PDF NCC Certificate. This is not a qualification, however it will be looked upon favorably by any existing or future employer.

Introduction - Defining Cybercrimes (+ Glossary)
Module 1 - Cyber-dependent Crime (I)   - Hacking & Hacktivism
Module 2 - Cyber-dependent Crime (II)  - Malware
Module 3 - Cyber-dependent Crime (III) - DoS Attacks
Module 4 - Cyber-enabled Crime (I)   - Cyber-Frauds, Scams & Cons
Module 5 - Cyber-enabled Crime (II)  - Theft
Module 6 - Cyber-enabled Crime (III) - Sex Offending
Module 7 - Cyber-enabled Crime (IV) - Cyberterrorism
Module 8 - Cyberstalking & Paedophilia
Module 9 - Cyberbullying
Module 10 - Organised Cybercrime
Module 11 - Virtual ‘Pirates’: Intellectual property, copyright & piracy
Module 12 - e-Crime Investigation (I)  - Legislation
Module 13 - e-Crime Investigation (II) - Digital Evidence
Module 14 - e-Crime Investigation (II) – Investigative Strategy & Procedure
Module 15 - Cyber Security – The Threat
Module 16 - Reducing Cyber Risk

You'll have access to the course for twelve months, with no tutor support provided

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Course Description

The short course in Cybercrime opens the door to the world of crime that largely remains hidden behind misleading statistics and its many definitions, e.g. Criminal motivations, public and media fears and misperceived offenders. There is no doubt that ‘cyberspace’ appears to offer a vast range of new opportunities for criminal and deviant activities. It is a domain, with a brief history of barely three decades, which has been plagued with fears about its darker, border-free criminal activity, a fear felt by individuals and companies alike. Cybercrime offenders no longer require complex skills or techniques originally attributable to the first hackers. In the developing country context, in particular, sub-cultures of young engaged in computer-related financial fraud have emerged, many of whom begin involvement in cybercrime in later teenage years. Victims, however, are far-reaching, hence the fear. This is unsurprising given the range of offences which spread from online credit card fraud, identity and data theft, phishing, unauthorised access to an e-mail account, to child pornography, hate speech and post 9/11 concerns about global cyber terrorism.

This comprehensive short course contains a number of modules which tackle the considerable literature addressing issues such as the types of offences, the causes and motivations behind cyber-offending, the experiences of the victims of such crimes, the challenges facing investigative authorities, and the attempts at cybersecurity and how cybercrime is shaping the future development and use of the internet.

The initial modules provide an overview of cybercrime and the various types committed, from the most widespread offences such as hacking, identity theft and the use of viruses (considered cyber-dependent crime), to fraud, theft and sex offending (cyber-enabled crime). This includes descriptions and explanations of how the crimes are committed and possible motivations of the offenders. Particular attention is focused on subsequent modules dealing with more contemporary issues such as cyberstalking and bullying and how the development of social media has influenced the scale of such crimes. An overview of the challenges is also provided in later modules, as they relate to the investigation and prosecution of cybercrime.

After a summary of some of the investigative strategies undertaken by international and regional organisations in the fight against cybercrime, the course then continues with an analysis of different approaches with regard to international cooperation, the responsibility of Internet service providers and cybersecurity. Throughout the modules, learners are presented with case studies and assignments which require taking different disciplinary perspectives to answer essay questions and/or investigative perspectives in order to solve challenges or crimes.

This course will incorporate a variety of perspectives: psychology; criminological psychology; criminology; law; computer science; policing; security and intelligence services; government policy, etc. For this reason, there will be a multitude of terms and abbreviations which may be new to the learner. These include terms from the innocent sounding ‘vishing’ (as oppose to ‘smishing’) or ‘pharming’ or the scary sounding Carberp Trojan and Doxing (a favoured approach of hacktivists) to the more commonly-used terms such as cyber-espionage or Identity Theft.

Abbreviations which are frequently used in the cybercrime policy and support literature may also be relatively unknown even to learners who are computer and technology savvy – e.g. IC3, EMV, NFSA, SFA, PUK, etc. For this reason, a Glossary/Abbreviations table is provided in the opening Introduction. It is recommended the student print off this section and keep handy when reading through the various modules.

This is a knowledge based online course, with a short multiple choice exam after you've read all of the learning material. A downloadable certificate will be available upon completion from NCC Resources

Previous Knowledge

The good news is that no prior learning knowledge or experience is essential to take this course. This short course is openly available to anyone wishing to learn more about Cybercrime and would like to take part in a highly rewarding home study course. You'll have access to the course for twelve months, with no tutor support provided

Note: This is a self study short course, with a multiple choice exam for completion. You'll be provided with an NCC Certificate.

Assessment

There is no assessment, you'll complete a multiple choice exam to complete the short course.

You'll have access to the course for twelve months, with no tutor support provided

Introduction - Defining Cybercrimes (+ Glossary)
Module 1 - Cyber-dependent Crime (I)   - Hacking & Hacktivism
Module 2 - Cyber-dependent Crime (II)  - Malware
Module 3 - Cyber-dependent Crime (III) - DoS Attacks
Module 4 - Cyber-enabled Crime (I)   - Cyber-Frauds, Scams & Cons
Module 5 - Cyber-enabled Crime (II)  - Theft
Module 6 - Cyber-enabled Crime (III) - Sex Offending
Module 7 - Cyber-enabled Crime (IV) - Cyberterrorism
Module 8 - Cyberstalking & Paedophilia
Module 9 - Cyberbullying
Module 10 - Organised Cybercrime
Module 11 - Virtual ‘Pirates’: Intellectual property, copyright & piracy
Module 12 - e-Crime Investigation (I)  - Legislation
Module 13 - e-Crime Investigation (II) - Digital Evidence
Module 14 - e-Crime Investigation (II) – Investigative Strategy & Procedure
Module 15 - Cyber Security – The Threat
Module 16 - Reducing Cyber Risk

Awarding Organisation

At the end of this short course successful learners will be awarded a downloadable PDF NCC Certificate. This is not a qualification, however it will be looked upon favorably by any existing or future employer.

Why should you choose NCC for your home learning?

1

Price Match

We promise to price match if you find the same course elsewhere. Contact our team within 14 days of purchase and we will refund the difference.

2

Customer Reviews

We're the top rated home learning provider on the independent reviews site, Trustpilot - currently rated 9.7/10 for customer service.

3

Choice

Unlike many distance learning providers, we offer our students the choice of learning online, or from a paper booklet.

4

Payment Plans

Choose to pay for your course in full, or spread the cost with monthly instalments. Payment plans are interest-free, and no credit checks are undertaken.

5

Tutor Support

Our course tutors are experts in their field. They're on hand to mark your assignments and offer feedback and guidance throughout your course.

6

Your Pace

Work at your own pace. Our team will support you, but won't chase you for work or apply deadlines for submissions. 

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£95.00

Method of study

online